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CPU MOTHERBOARD TECH VIDEO REVIEWS

"Windows 3.1 information with details of advanced Windows 3.1 features."

WINDOWS 3.1

WINDOWS 3.1 OPERATING SYSTEM

"Windows 3.1 was originally released on April 6, 1992 official support for the Windows 3.1 family ended on December 31, 2001, and Oem licensing for Windows for Workgroups 3.11 on embedded systems continued to be available until November 1, 2008."

"Windows 3.1 (originally codenamed Janus), released on April 6, 1992, includes a TrueType font system (and a set of highly legible fonts), which effectively made Windows a viable desktop publishing platform for the first time. Similar functionality was available for Windows 3.0 through the Adobe Type Manager (ATM) font system from Adobe."

"Windows 3.1 was designed to have backward compatibility with older Windows platforms. As with Windows 3.0, version 3.1 had File Manager and Program Manager, but unlike all previous versions, Windows 3.1 and later support 32 bit disk access, cannot run in real mode, and included Minesweeper as a replacement for Reversi (though Reversi was still included in some copies)."

"Windows 3.1 Multimedia PC Version (Beta only, released Nov 1992 codenamed Bombay) included a media viewer, and the ability to play video files. It was targeted to the new multimedia PC and included sound and video integration with CD ROM support."

"Windows 3.1 dropped real mode support and required a minimum of a 286 PC with 1MB of RAM to run. The effect of this was to increase system stability over the crash prone Windows 3.0. Some older features were removed like CGA graphics support (although the Windows 3.0 CGA driver will still work on 3.1) and compatibility with real mode Windows 2.x applications."

"In 386 enhanced mode, Windows 3.1 can theoretically access up to 4 GB of RAM, although it is limited to 64 MB because of the RAM limit on MS DOS 6.22 . The File Manager was significantly improved over Windows 3.0. Most significantly, Windows 3.1 added multimedia support for the first time."

"Windows for Workgroups 3.1 (originally codenamed Winball and later Sparta), released in October 1992, features native networking support. Windows for Workgroups 3.1 is an extended version of Windows 3.1 that comes with Smb file sharing support via the NetBIOS based Nbf and or Ipx network transport protocols, includes the Hearts card game, and introduced Vshare.386, the Virtual Device Driver version of the Share.Exe Terminate and Stay Resident program."

"Video for Windows was first introduced in November 1992 as a reaction to Apple Computer's QuickTime technology which added digital video to the Macintosh platform. Costing around $200, the software included editing and encoding programs for use with video input boards. A runtime version for viewing videos only was also made available. Originally released as a free add on to Windows 3.1 and Windows 3.11, it then became an integral component of Windows 95 and later. Like QuickTime there were three components in Video for Windows. The technology introduced a file format designed to store digital video, Audio Video Interleave (Avi). The technology provided an application programming interface that allowed software developers working on the Windows platform to add the ability to play or manipulate digital video to their own applications."

OPERATING SYSTEM

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